Author Archives: richardjohnbr

How did Palmerston secure British interests 1830-1841?

Henry John Temple, Lord Palmerston, became the Whig Foreign Secretary in late 1830. Born in 1784, Palmerston ­entered Parliament in 1807. In 1809, he became Secretary at War, without a seat in the cabinet. He remained at the War Office … Continue reading

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How did Canning secure British interests 1822 -1830?

George Canning had already held the post between 1807 and 1809. Only his unwillingness to serve with Castlereagh prevented his reappointment in July 1812. By 1816, Canning and Castlereagh appeared to have made up their differences, at least outwardly, and … Continue reading

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Radicalism and Chartism 1790-1860

Just Published Preparing this book for publication has taken me considerably longer than I anticipated.  This was largely my own doing since, instead of just joining the two books together, I decided to effectively rewrite them taking account of the … Continue reading

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Posted in Chartism, Nineteenth century politics, Nineteenth century society, Nineteenth century women

Lincolnshire Lives

Having completed eleven volumes in his series of books on Birmingham, Stephen Roberts has now broadened his horizons into Lincolnshire.  I suggested, flippantly, that he call it Lincolnshire Sausages but he wisely settled on Lincolnshire Lives. The first volume in … Continue reading

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British Foreign Policy and Castlereagh

After the defeat of France in 1814 and 1815, Britain played a central role in redrawing the map of Europe at the Congress of Vienna. 1814-1815 Congress of Vienna 1818 Congress at Aix-la-Chapelle 1820 Congress at Troppau 1821 Congress at … Continue reading

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My Books and other publications

Those publications with an asterisk (*) were co-written with C.W. Daniels. This list does not include editorials for Teaching History, book reviews or unpublished papers. Neither does it include the two series of books for which I have been joint-editor: … Continue reading

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Posted in Australia, Autobiographical fragments, Books, Canadian history, Nineteenth century politics, Nineteenth century society, Nineteenth century women, The Normans

Published in Kindle

It’s almost a year since I published second editions of my Rebellion Quartet and I’m hoping that I will write the final volume next year.  In the interim I have converted the published volumes into Kindles so that access is … Continue reading

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Posted in Australia, Books, Canadian history, Chartism | Tagged

Politicians return ‘to school’

Britain’s relationship with Europe over the past millennium has been one of ‘divide and rule’ and this has meant that we’ve fought against the French with the Germans, the Germans with the French, the Spanish with the French and against … Continue reading

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Britain 1780-1945: Reforming Society

NOW PUBLISHED Britain 1780-1945: Reforming Society develops the ideas and chronological scope that I put forward in my earlier studies of Britain’s social and economic development during the late-eighteenth, nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. The result is a new history of … Continue reading

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Fragments from an Unexceptional Life

We all, in one way or another, live unexceptional lives. We are born, we go to school and increasingly university, we start work, enter relationships that may or may not lead to children who we watch grow into adults and, … Continue reading

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From Peace to Victory: Amiens to Waterloo 1802-1815

The Peace of Amiens, negotiated by Hawkesbury (later Lord Liverpool) and Cornwallis and ratified by Parliament in May 1802, received a poor press from contemporaries and subsequently from historians. The surren­der of Austria deprived Britain of any leverage in Europe … Continue reading

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Is leaving now really an option?

Let me be clear from the outset that I was one of the 48 per cent who voted remain in the referendum almost two years ago.  I was also one of those who was not surprised by the outcome of … Continue reading

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Why did Britain not win the war with France 1793 and 1802?

The outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789 was initially welcomed by most politicians. The Whigs saw it as the dawn of liberty. For Pitt, the revolution would be a useful distraction for Britain’s major rival. Edmund Burke found in … Continue reading

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Posted in Books, Nineteenth century politics, Uncategorized | Tagged , , ,

Recollections of Victorian Birmingham

This book offers readers an absorbing portrait of Birmingham’s nineteenth century. It provides eyewitness accounts of the main events and personalities of the time. These twenty-five autobiographical articles were originally published in the Birmingham Gazette and Express in 1907-9, but … Continue reading

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What were British foreign interests between 1793 and 1841?

In the fifty-four years before 1793, Britain had fought three major wars with France lasting some twenty-three years. Britain could not ignore France and the threat to European security posed by the expansion of the French Revolution. Lord Auckland declared … Continue reading

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