Category Archives: Peel: The 1830s

Why did the Conservatives become more electable?

  Between 1835 and 1841 several things helped the Conservative Party to become more electable.   Improvements in electoral management Improvements had certainly been made to the Conservatives’ organisational machine though it is difficult to asses its precise impact on … Continue reading

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Peel in Opposition 1835-1841

  After the failure of his unintended months in government, Peel was inclined to bide his time and avoid any action that might lead to an immediate return to power. He was anxious that William IV should not attempt another … Continue reading

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Peel’s ‘Hundred Days’: December 1834-April 1835

  King William IV dismissed Melbourne’s[1] government in November 1834. It had only been in power since July when Earl Grey retired but the king did not like the direction of its policy towards the Irish Church. Initially he turned … Continue reading

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Peel, reform and opposition

  The Tory party, decimated in the general election in late 1832, was in a demoralised state. It had been marked as the party that opposed reform. The reality was less stark. Unquestionably there were die-hard opponents of reform among … Continue reading

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Peel to 1832

  In 1856, six years after Sir Robert Peel’s death, the journalist Walter Bagehot, wrote that[1] “No man [Sir Robert Peel] has come so near our definition of a constitutional statesman — the powers of a first-rate man and the … Continue reading

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