Category Archives: Women and the economy

Women in the Economy: Middle class women

  The employment of women in Victorian England was hindered by two factors. First, women shared with male workers the insecurities of employment brought about by the fluctuating nature of the Victorian economy. Secondly, they battled alone against the voice … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Nineteenth century women, Women and the economy | Leave a comment

Women in the Economy: Unionism and Protection

  By the end of the nineteenth century it is possible to see the sexual division of labour clearly in operation. Women were concentrated into a few low paid industries — where the great majority of employees were female — … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Nineteenth century women, Women and the economy | Leave a comment

Women in the Economy: Working class 3

  Types of work: some examples The notions of ‘a woman’s job’ and ‘a woman’s rate’ were regarded by employers, trade unions and by women workers themselves as a ‘natural’ phenomenon throughout this period. The consequence this [or was it … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Nineteenth century women, Women and the economy | Leave a comment

Women in the Economy: Working class 2

  How did women’s work developed between the 1830s and 1914? Domestic service, the textile trade and the clothing trades accounted for eighty per cent of all women in recorded occupations in 1851. In contrast the number of women in … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Nineteenth century women, Women and the economy | Leave a comment

Women in the Economy: Working class 1

  Working class women and work There are difficulties defining the ‘working classes’ but generally the term is used to cover women who worked with their hands, who were paid wages, not salaries, and who did not employ other people; … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Nineteenth century women, Women and the economy | Leave a comment

Women in the Economy: Introduction

  Between 1830 and 1914 there were significant and radical changes in many areas of British economic and social life. The critical question is whether there were parallel changes in the world of women’s work. This section explores this issue … Continue reading

Rate this:

Posted in Nineteenth century women, Women and the economy | Leave a comment